Show Navigation

The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume 1, song 1, page 1 - 'The Highland Queen' and 'The Highland King'

Back

View Large Image

Volume I, song 001, page 1 - 'The Highland Queen' and 'The Highland King'

Introduction:
There are two sets of lyrics given to the same melody here. This is the first verse of 'The Highland Queen':
'No more my Song shall be,
ye swains, of purling streams, or flow'ry plains;
More pleasing beauties now inspire,
And Phoebus tunes the warbling Lyre:
Divinely aided thus I mean,
To celebrate, to celebrate my Highland Queen.'
The second set of lyrics, for 'The Highland King', begin, 'Ye Muses nine, O lend your aid,
Inspire a tender bashful maid!'.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
2133
Project:
754:Scots Musical Museum
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
130 x 211 mm
What:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' - Volume 1, song 1, page 1 - 'The Highland Queen' and 'The Highland King'
Subject:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Who:
Dr Thomas Blacklock (song collector, poet and lyricist)
William Clarke (c. 1755-1820) (musical editor for Volume VI of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Stephen Clarke (c. 1735-97) (musical editor)
James Johnson (c. 1750-1811) (printer / publisher / engraver / editor)
Robert Burns (1759-96) (song collector / composer / editor)
Mr MacVicar (composer)
When:
Between 1787 and 1803 (first publication of the 'Scots Musical Museum')
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The 'Scots Musical Museum' is the most important of the numerous eighteenth- and nineteenth-century collections of Scottish song. When the engraver James Johnson started work on the second volume of his collection in 1787, he enlisted Robert Burns as contributor and editor. Burns enthusiastically collected songs from various sources, often expanding or revising them, whilst including much of his own work. The resulting combination of innovation and antiquarianism gives the work a feel of living tradition.
Description:
Robert Burns was given 'The Highland Queen' by the poet Dr Thomas Blacklock (1721-91). Blacklock told him that the words and music were composed by a Mr McVicar, who was ship's purser (accountant) on 'The Solbay Man of War'. Burns had a strong friendship with Dr Blacklock, 'the blind bard', and at least four of Blacklock's songs were included in the 'Museum'.