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The Second Commonplace Book of Robert Burns

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The Second Commonplace Book of Robert Burns (page 04 of 40)

Introduction:
Burns when he was in Edinburgh decided to create his second Commonplace Book where he could record his thoughts and compositions as they occurred to him. Commenced on April 9th 1787, its pages are numbered from 1 to 40 with pages 23-26 missing. The bulk of the pages contain copies of poems, which he saved for later use, and his personal reflections are confined to the first dozen or so pages.
Image Rights Holder:
National Trust for Scotland
Ref:
BMT190D
Project:
618:The Burns Manuscripts at Alloway
What:
The Second Commonplace Book of Robert Burns
Subject:
Burns feels he has been ignored in favour of a person whom he considers has not the abilities to become 'an eight penny taylor' and 'whose heart is not worth three farthings'. On the next page he reveals that the person with whom he is upset is his patron the Earl of Glencairn.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (author)
When:
9th April 1787 (when written)
Where:
The Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, South Ayrshire
Background:
Burns feels he has been ignored in favour of a person whom he considers has not the abilities to become 'an eight penny taylor' and 'whose heart is not worth three farthings'. On the next page he reveals that the person with whom he is upset is his patron the Earl of Glencairn.
Description:
Page 4 continues the last two verses of 'Rantin, Rovin Robin' in the name of Davie with a couple of small differences in the last verse. Burns then starts more discussion which is headed by some text, thought to be written by Currie his biographer. Here Burns is expressing an indignant concern at the way he has been treated.