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Postcard of Jane Emma Burns Brown and Jean Armour Burns Brown at Burns House, Dumfries c 1905 (2)

Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Project:
:Future Museum
Material:
paper
Dimensions:
width: 137 mm, length: 87 mm
What:
Robert Burns
Subject:
postcard
Who:
When:
early 20th century
Where:
Background:
Lockwood, David “Celebrate the Legend – Discover Robert Burns in Dumfries and Galloway”. Dumfries: Dumfries and Galloway Council, 2009; Mackay, James A “Burns-Lore of Dumfries and Galloway”. Ayr: Alloway Publishing Limited, 1988; Mackay, James “Burnsiana”. Ayr: Alloway Publishing Limited, 1988; Town Council of the Royal Burgh of Dumfries (Issued) “Catalogue of Exhibits with Official Handbook of Burns’ House Dumfries and other memories of the National Poet”. Dumfries: Robert Dinwiddie, 1944; Welsh, Alex (Edited) “Handbook of the Dumfries Burns Club”. Dumfries: Robert Dinwiddie, 1955; Westwood, Peter J “Genealogical Charts of the Family of Robert Burns and Descending Families”. Kilmarnock: The Burns Federation, 1997; Westwood, Peter J “The Deltiology of Robert Burns”. Dumfries: Creedon Publications, 1994
Description:

A colour tinted  postcard from a photograph of two direct descendants of Robert Burns, taken at the doorway of the house in which he died.

 

Jane Emma Burns Brown was the daughter of Robert Burns junior, the poet's eldest son and one of the few members of his family to live in Dumfries. Her daughter, Jean Armour Burns Brown, was said to bear an uncanny resemblance to her famous forebear.

 

Because of this she became something of a celebrity in her own right, touring in Scotland and North America. She was regularly invited to ceremonies and events associated with Robert Burns and occurs in many postcards from  c 1900 onwards.

 

This postcard shows mother and daughter on the steps outside Burns House, Dumfries. It was taken shortly after 1903 when the house was let to the Town Council of Dumfries and the room in which the poet died was opened to the public as a small Burns museum. The remainder of the house was occupied by the Brown family who were employed as caretakers.