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Postcard illustrating "Auld Lang Syne" by Robert Burns

Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Project:
:Future Museum
Material:
paper
Dimensions:
width: 137 mm, length: 88 mm
What:
Robert Burns
Subject:
postcard
Who:
Valentine and Sons, Dundee (Publisher)
When:
20th Century
Where:
Background:
Burns, Robert “The Complete Letters of Robert Burns”, Ed. James A Mackay. Ayr: Alloway Publishing Limited, 1987; Burns, Robert “The Complete Poetical Work of Robert Burns 1759 – 1796”, Ed. Dr James A Mackay. Ayr: Alloway Publishing Limited, 1993; Burns, Robert “The Letters of Robert Burns”, 2 vols., Ed. J de Lancey Ferguson and G Ross Roy. Oxford: Clarendon, 1985; Burns, Robert “The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns”, 3 vols., Ed. James Kinsley. Oxford: Clarendon, 1968; Crawford, Robert “The Bard – Robert Burns, a Biography”. London: Jonathan Cape, 2009; Hogg, Patrick Scott “Robert Burns – The Patriot Bard”. Edinburgh: Mainstream, 2008; Lindsay, Maurice “Robert Burns – The Man, his Work, the Legend”. New York and London: Robert Hale and St Martin’s Press, 1979; Lindsay, Maurice “The Burns Encyclopaedia”, 3rd edition. London and New York: Robert Hale and St Martin’s Press, 1980; Mackay, James “Burnsiana”. Ayr: Alloway Publishing Limited, 1988; Mackay, James “A Biography of Robert Burns”. Edinburgh: Mainstream, 1992; McIntyre, Ian “Dirt & Deity – A Life of Robert Burns”. London: HarperCollins, 1995; Westwood, Peter J “The Deltiology of Robert Burns”. Dumfries: Creedon Publications, 1994
Description:

A coloured lithographic postcard of scene from Robert Burns' most famous song.

 

Robert Burns created "Auld Lang Syne", perhaps the best known song in the English language (although it is actually written in Scots) by reworking a snatch of a traditional song which he had collected. He first wrote down a version of it in 1788 whilst living at Ellisland Farm, 5 miles north of Dumfries.

 

This postcard illustrates the verse beginning, "We twa hae paidl't in the burn.." and shows a nostalgic scene of two boys wearing kilts. They are knee deep in a stream and have caught a large fish in a piece of tartan cloth. Surrounding them is a treeless Highland landscape.

 

The sender has written the message in black ink, then turned the card through 90 degrees and continued in red ink, thus maximising the amount of information sent. Both parts of the message are perfectly legible.