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Poem by Robert Burns: 'Tam o' Shanter - A Tale'

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Poem by Robert Burns: 'Tam o' Shanter - A Tale', page 03 of 14

Introduction:
Tam has spent the evening in a pub getting drunk with his friends and on his way home on horseback encounters the devil and a crowd of witches cavorting inside the auld Kirk of Alloway. Careless with drink, Tam disturbs the witches and flees towards the nearby bridge over the river Doon - with the witches in hot pursuit. (poem No 321)
Image Rights Holder:
National Trust for Scotland
Ref:
BMT331.02C
Project:
618:The Burns Manuscripts at Alloway
What:
Poem by Robert Burns: 'Tam o' Shanter - A Tale'
Subject:
Printed in the second volume of The Antiquities of Scotland by Captain Grose. Burns had persuaded Grose to include a drawing of Alloway Kirk in his work which Grose agreed to do, on condition that Burns provided him with a suitable poem to go with the engraving.
Who:
Tam o' Shanter (a farming character based loosely on Douglas Graham of Shanter (1739-1811))
Robert Burns (author)
Souter Johnnie (a cobbler character based loosely on John Davidson (1728-1806) of Kirkoswald)
Auld Kirk Alloway (built c. 1516, last used for worship by 1756)
Captain Frances Grose (1731-1791) (historian and friend of Burns)
When:
November 1790 (period of composition)
Where:
The Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, South Ayrshire
Background:
Printed in the second volume of The Antiquities of Scotland by Captain Grose. Burns had persuaded Grose to include a drawing of Alloway Kirk in his work which Grose agreed to do, on condition that Burns provided him with a suitable poem to go with the engraving.
Description:
Page three of fourteen which reads from 'She prophesied' down to 'growing better'. Burns introduces the haunted character of the Alloway Kirk where Kate sees another possible demise for Tam. Then Burns reflects on the unhappy lot of the wives showing a sincere appreciation for their predicament. Turning to his 'Tale' he first paints a convivial scene of growing drunkenness in the pub.