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Print entitled 'Mauchline, Gavin Hamilton's House'

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'Mauchline, Gavin Hamilton's House', 1846

Introduction:
Robert Burns first met his wife, Jean Armour in Mauchline in 1784 shortly after his family moved to the farm of Mossgiel close to the town. She was one of the 'Mauchline Belles'. The record of the date of their marriage is unclear and their relationship was opposed by her parents, but in September 1786 she gave birth to twins.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
152
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 92 mm, width: 133 mm
What:
Print entitled 'Mauchline, Gavin Hamilton's House'
Subject:
This view of Mauchline was published in 'The Land of Burns - A series of Landscapes and Portraits, Illustrative of the Life and Writings of the Scottish Poet'. This was published in 1846 by Blackie and Son of Glasgow. At this time the development of steel plate engraving made it possible for images to be reproduced in much greater numbers than previous printing technology had allowed. Books such as this one, illustrated by engravings of works by eminent artists became popular, although they were still expensive and beyond the pocket of most people.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (he lived near here)
Jean Armour Burns (1767-1834) (wife of the poet, Robert Burns) (she married Burns here)
Gavin Hamilton (1753-1805) (his home)
Robert Chambers (1802-1871) (author)
Professor Wilson (author)
Blackie and Son (Queen Street, Glasgow) (publisher)
W and D Duncan (Glasgow) (printer)
J T Willmore (engraver)
David Octavius Hill RA (1802-1870) (artist)
When:
1846
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
This view of Mauchline was published in 'The Land of Burns - A series of Landscapes and Portraits, Illustrative of the Life and Writings of the Scottish Poet'. This was published in 1846 by Blackie and Son of Glasgow. At this time the development of steel plate engraving made it possible for images to be reproduced in much greater numbers than previous printing technology had allowed. Books such as this one, illustrated by engravings of works by eminent artists became popular, although they were still expensive and beyond the pocket of most people.
Description:
The next year saw the publication of the Kilmarnock edition of Burns' poems and his success in Edinburgh society, yet during this time he and Jean met again, and again she became pregnant by him. She was thrown out by her parents and it was at this juncture that Burns took rooms for her in Mauchline and arranged for a doctor to attend her confinement. Jean was delivered of another set of twins, who unfortunately died within a few weeks of their birth. Later that year Robert Burns and Jean Armour were married privately in the offices of Gavin Hamilton, a solicitor and friend, in Mauchline.