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Letter of Robert Burns to Robert Graham dated Dumfries 5 January 1793

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Letter of Robert Burns to Robert Graham dated Dumfries 5 January 1793 (page 2 of 7)

Introduction:
Seven page letter which Burns writes to Graham in defence of the disloyalty charges which had been brought against him. He gives a detailed response to refute each charge and feels he has accounted well enough for himself to ask Graham to support his next scheme for advancement. (letter No 530)
Image Rights Holder:
National Trust for Scotland
Ref:
BMT173.12B
Project:
618:The Burns Manuscripts at Alloway
What:
Letter of Robert Burns to Robert Graham dated Dumfries 5 January 1793
Subject:
He denies having sung the republican song rather than the loylist royal anthem and goes on to deny other charges of speaking against the King, claiming he would be too respectable a citizen to 'yell in the howlings of a rabble'. His denial on this score was considered to be a little weak.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (author)
Robert Graham, 12th Laird of Fintry (1749-1815) (friend and patron of Burns)
When:
5th January 1793 (when written)
Where:
The Robert Burns Birthplace Museum, South Ayrshire
Background:
He denies having sung the republican song rather than the loylist royal anthem and goes on to deny other charges of speaking against the King, claiming he would be too respectable a citizen to 'yell in the howlings of a rabble'. His denial on this score was considered to be a little weak.
Description:
Page two discusses the charge that Burns did not show the correct deference of standing up and removing his hat when the National anthem was played at a theatrical show in Dumfries. Burns refers to this as the Ç?Çÿ ira situation when this French revolutionary song was called to be sung in the theatre.