Show Navigation

Print entitled 'Friars Carse, Dumfries-shire', 1793

Back

View Large Image

'Friars Carse, Dumfries-shire', 1793

Introduction:
Robert Burns' neighbour at Ellisland was Robert Riddell of Friar's Carse, a country estate upstream from the farm. Immediately recognising Burns' talent, Riddell offered him the use of a summer house on the estate in which to meditate and write, away from the demands of the farm.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
213
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 112 mm, width: 168 mm
What:
Print entitled 'Friars Carse, Dumfries-shire', 1793
Subject:
The mansion house was built in 1774 on the site of the medieval monastery which had occupied the estate. Robert Burns was a frequent visitor there and wrote several poems in honour of his host. This engraving is made from a drawing by the artist, Alexander Reid who also painted a miniature portrait of the poet.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (he visited here)
Captain Robert Riddell of Glenriddell (1755-1794) (property of)
Alexander Reid (1747-1823) (artist (after))
Thomas Medland (d 1833) (engraver)
J Walker (16 Rosomans Street, London) (publisher)
When:
1 September 1793 (published)
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
The mansion house was built in 1774 on the site of the medieval monastery which had occupied the estate. Robert Burns was a frequent visitor there and wrote several poems in honour of his host. This engraving is made from a drawing by the artist, Alexander Reid who also painted a miniature portrait of the poet.
Description:
It was here that Burns composed the poem beginning, 'Thou whom chance may hither lead' as a tribute to Robert Riddell and their growing friendship. They collaborated on several songs with Riddell supplying the airs for Burns lyrics. He was a collector of traditional Scottish music, a passion which he shared with the poet.