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Drawing of Friars Carse, Dumfries, c 1840

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'Friars Carse, Dumfries, Scene of the Whistle' c 1840

Introduction:
Robert Burns' neighbour at Ellisland was Robert Riddell of Friar's Carse, a country estate upstream from the farm. Immediately recognising Burns' talent, Riddell offered him the use of a summer house on the estate in which to meditate and write, away from the demands of the farm.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
116
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 133 mm, width: 215 mm
What:
Drawing of Friars Carse, Dumfries, c 1840
Subject:
William Coston Aitken (1816 = 1875) was born, educated and married in Dumfries before moving to Birmingham around 1850. He sketched places in and around Dumfries from a young age and his work is a record of the built environment of the town and the landmarks of the surrounding countryside in the first part of the 19th century.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (he visited here)
William Coston Aitken (1816-1875) (artist)
Captain Robert Riddell of Glenriddell (1755-1794) (property of)
When:
c 1840
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
William Coston Aitken (1816 = 1875) was born, educated and married in Dumfries before moving to Birmingham around 1850. He sketched places in and around Dumfries from a young age and his work is a record of the built environment of the town and the landmarks of the surrounding countryside in the first part of the 19th century.
Description:
This drawing shows the mansion house which Robert Riddell built in 1774 on the site of the medieval monastery which had occupied the estate. Robert Burns was a frequent visitor here and wrote several poems in honour of his host. 'The Whistle' is a poem commemorating a notorious drinking competition held there between Riddell and his guests, the winner being the last drinker capable of blowing a whistle!