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Print entitled 'Friars Carse'

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'Friars Carse', 1846

Introduction:
Robert Burns' neighbour at Ellisland was Robert Riddell of Friar's Carse, a country estate upstream from the farm. Immediately recognising Burns' talent, Riddell offered him the use of a summer house on the estate in which to meditate and write, away from the demands of the farm.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
168
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 95 mm, width: 142 mm
What:
Print entitled 'Friars Carse'
Subject:
This view of Friars Carse was published in 'The Land of Burns - A series of Landscapes and Portraits, Illustrative of the Life and Writings of the Scottish Poet'. This was published in 1846 by Blackie and Son of Glasgow. At this time the development of steel plate engraving made it possible for images to be reproduced in much greater numbers than previous printing technology had allowed. Books such as this one, illustrated by engravings of works by eminent artists became popular, although they were still expensive and beyond the pocket of most people.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (he visited here)
Captain Robert Riddell of Glenriddell (1755-1794) (property of)
Professor Wilson (author)
Robert Chambers (1802-1871) (author)
Blackie and Son (Queen Street, Glasgow) (publisher)
W and D Duncan (Glasgow) (printer)
James Giles (1801-1870) (engraver)
David Octavius Hill RA (1802-1870) (artist)
When:
1846
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
This view of Friars Carse was published in 'The Land of Burns - A series of Landscapes and Portraits, Illustrative of the Life and Writings of the Scottish Poet'. This was published in 1846 by Blackie and Son of Glasgow. At this time the development of steel plate engraving made it possible for images to be reproduced in much greater numbers than previous printing technology had allowed. Books such as this one, illustrated by engravings of works by eminent artists became popular, although they were still expensive and beyond the pocket of most people.
Description:
It was here that Burns composed the poem beginning, 'Thou whom chance may hither lead' as a tribute to Robert Riddell and their growing friendship. They collaborated on several songs with Riddell supplying the airs for Burns lyrics. He was a collector of traditional Scottish music, a passion which he shared with the poet.