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C) Image from Robert Burns, 'Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect', Edinburgh, 1787

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C) Title-page from Robert Burns, 'Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect', Edinburgh, 1787

Introduction:
Encouraged by the success of the first edition of his poems printed in Kilmarnock, Ayrshire, in 1786, Burns (1759-96) went to Edinburgh with the intention of launching a second and larger edition. He persuaded William Creech, the foremost Scottish publisher of the time, to sponsor the venture which soon attracted 1,500 subscribers. Within a short space of time the bard was being fǦted by the leaders of the social and literary scene in the Scottish capital.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
9143
Project:
748:Treasures: National Library of Scotland
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
130 x 209mm
What:
C) Image from Robert Burns, 'Poems, chiefly in the Scottish Dialect', Edinburgh, 1787
Subject:
Their appearance in a volume of secular poetry must have raised a few eyebrows at the time, but appears to have excited little comment since. It was no doubt the consequence of the poet's friendship with Bishop John Geddes (1735-99) who in addition to his pastoral duties found some time to be a contributor to the Encyclopedia Britannica and a founder member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.
Who:
Robert Burns (author)
William Creech (publisher)
Bishop John Geddes (associated)
Society of Antiquaries of Scotland (associated)
When:
1786 (date of first publication)
1790 (date of first publication in Edinburgh)
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
Their appearance in a volume of secular poetry must have raised a few eyebrows at the time, but appears to have excited little comment since. It was no doubt the consequence of the poet's friendship with Bishop John Geddes (1735-99) who in addition to his pastoral duties found some time to be a contributor to the Encyclopedia Britannica and a founder member of the Society of Antiquaries of Scotland.
Description:
Burns's popularity has never faltered in the two centuries that have passed since his arrival in Edinburgh and scarcely a year passes without the publication here or abroad of some of the works of Scotland's most famous poet. One interesting feature of the extensive subscribers' list is the somewhat unlikely inclusion among them of the Scottish Roman Catholic seminaries in Europe at Paris, Douai and Valladolid.