Show Navigation

C) Image of the first page of an article by Thomas Carlyle on J.G.Lockhart's 'Life of Burns', 1828

Back

View Large Image

C) First page of an article by Thomas Carlyle on J.G.Lockhart's 'Life of Burns', Edinburgh Review, vol. 48, December 1828, p. 267

Introduction:
The opening article in the 'Edinburgh Review' of December 1828 was Carlyle's review-essay on J.G. Lockhart's 'Life of Burns', a subsequently much-anthologised piece which during its preparation had been the subject of a prolonged dispute between Carlyle and the editor, Francis Jeffrey, who had objected both to its length and its style. Carlyle had insisted on its being printed substantially as he had written it.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
8059
Project:
748:Treasures: National Library of Scotland
Material:
Book
Dimensions:
127 x 205mm
What:
C) Image of the first page of an article by Thomas Carlyle on J.G.Lockhart's 'Life of Burns', 1828
Subject:
The National Library of Scotland is home to a large collection of materials relating to the historian and essayist, Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881). This includes letters written by and to Carlyle, the journal of his wife, Jane Welsh Carlyle, and the manuscripts of Carlyle's 'Reminiscences'. For an author whose larger literary manuscripts are notoriously lacking, these are outstanding treasures in the national collection.
Who:
Edinburgh Review (periodical title)
Thomas Carlyle (author)
When:
December 1828 (date of publication)
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
The National Library of Scotland is home to a large collection of materials relating to the historian and essayist, Thomas Carlyle (1795-1881). This includes letters written by and to Carlyle, the journal of his wife, Jane Welsh Carlyle, and the manuscripts of Carlyle's 'Reminiscences'. For an author whose larger literary manuscripts are notoriously lacking, these are outstanding treasures in the national collection.
Description:
The 'Edinburgh Review' was founded in 1802 and was one of the most influential magazines of its day. Walter Scott was an early contributor but ceased submitting articles when the Whig affiliations of the 'Review' began to conflict with his own Tory stance.