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Cabinet card of Burns Mausoleum, 1882

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Burns Mausoleum Dumfries, 1882

Introduction:
In the years following his death, Robert Burns' admirers came to believe that his simple grave was an insufficient memorial to the poet. In 1813, John Syme formed a committee and launched an appeal to build a mausoleum in his memory. One of the subscribers was the Prince Regent, later George IV. After a public advertisement, over 50 designs were received and the plans of T F Hunt, a London architect were approved.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
101
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 153 mm, width: 98 mm
What:
Cabinet card of Burns Mausoleum, 1882
Subject:
Cabinet cards were almost always made from studio portraits, this one is unusual in that it is taken out of doors. They were produced to be sold or exchanged and were collected in elaborate albums, specially made for the purpose, often with window mounts to display the cards.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (his burial place)
John Syme (1755-1831) (set up Mausoleum fund)
King George IV (1762-1830) (subscriber to Mausoleum fund)
Thomas Frederick Hunt (1791-1831) (architect of Mausoleum)
William Grierson (1773-1852) (friend of Burns)
Dr Thomas Boyle Grierson (1818-1889) (previous owner)
J R (photographer)
When:
1882
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
Cabinet cards were almost always made from studio portraits, this one is unusual in that it is taken out of doors. They were produced to be sold or exchanged and were collected in elaborate albums, specially made for the purpose, often with window mounts to display the cards.
Description:
Burns Mausoleum became a place of pilgrimage for visitors to Dumfries. This cabinet card is originally from the collection of Dr Thomas Boyle Grierson of Thornhill, whose father, William Grierson, was a friend and supporter of Robert Burns. Dr Grierson was a prominent local antiquarian and member of the Burns movement in the later part of the nineteenth century.