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Broadside ballad entitled 'A Gude New Year to ane an' A'

Introduction:
Verse 1: 'A gude New-year to ane and a', / And mony may ye see, / And during a' the years to come, / Oh happy may ye be. / and may ye ne'er ha'e cause to mourn, / To sigh or shed a tear - / To ane and a', baith great and sma', a hearty guid New-year.' This ballad was to be sung to an 'Original' tune, was priced at one penny and was published on Saturday, 30th December 1865 by the Poet's Box, probably in Glasgow.
Image Rights Holder:
National Library of Scotland
Ref:
16033
Project:
749:Popular Print in Scotland, 1650-1850
Material:
Broadside
Dimensions:
103 x 264mm
Subject:
Early ballads were dramatic or humorous narrative songs derived from folk culture that predated printing. Originally perpetuated by word of mouth, many ballads survive because they were recorded on broadsides. Musical notation was rarely printed, as tunes were usually established favourites. The term 'ballad' eventually applied more broadly to any kind of topical or popular verse.
Who:
Poet's Box (publisher)
Auld Lang Syne (associated song)
Robert Burns (associated poet)
National Library of Scotland (keeper of collection)
When:
30 December 1865 (date of publication)
Where:
The National Library of Scotland, Edinburgh
Background:
Early ballads were dramatic or humorous narrative songs derived from folk culture that predated printing. Originally perpetuated by word of mouth, many ballads survive because they were recorded on broadsides. Musical notation was rarely printed, as tunes were usually established favourites. The term 'ballad' eventually applied more broadly to any kind of topical or popular verse.
Description:
The sentiments of this song are fairly typical of what might be expected even today at a Scottish New Year or Hogmanay party. Nostalgic memories, the passing of time, partings and reunions, and high hopes for the future are all elements in this song, just as they are in the more eloquent, most famous Hogmanay song of all, 'Auld Lang Syne'. In particular, the images of braes and trees in the third verse here appear to have been inspired directly by Burns's adaptation of 'Auld Lang Syne', the version most commonly sung today.