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Carte de visite of Betty Burns, daughter of Robert Burns, c 1870

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Betty Burns or Park, Mrs Elizabeth Thomson, c 1860

Introduction:
Betty Burns, was the illegitimate daughter of Robert Burns and Helen Anne or Anna Park, whom he met in 1790. Her aunt and uncle, Mr and Mrs Hyslop were the proprietors of Burns' favourite inn, the Globe Inn, Dumfries.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
108
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 90 mm, width: 59 mm
What:
Carte de visite of Betty Burns, daughter of Robert Burns, c 1870
Subject:
Carte de visite cards were almost always studio portraits, they were produced to be sold or exchanged and were collected in elaborate albums, specially made for the purpose, often with window mounts to display the cards. This carte de visite card dates from the 1860s when they were at the height of their popularity it comes from an album which belonged to Jean Armour Burns Brown, the poet's great granddaughter.
Who:
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (his daughter)
John Thomson (1788-1869) (his wife)
Mr and Mrs Hyslop (Globe Inn, Dumfries) (their niece)
Jean Armour Burns Brown (1864-1937) (great grand daughter of Robert Burns) (previous owner)
Helen Anne or Anna Park (Globe Inn, Dumfries) (her daughter)
Elizabeth 'Betty' Burns or Park (Mrs John Thomson)(1791-1873)(daughter of Robert Burns by Anna Park) (representation)
When:
c 1860
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
Carte de visite cards were almost always studio portraits, they were produced to be sold or exchanged and were collected in elaborate albums, specially made for the purpose, often with window mounts to display the cards. This carte de visite card dates from the 1860s when they were at the height of their popularity it comes from an album which belonged to Jean Armour Burns Brown, the poet's great granddaughter.
Description:
Betty was born in 1791 at much the same time as Burns' son Francis Wallace and with remarkable humanity his wife, Jean Armour Burns adopted the little girl and raised her as part of the family. She married a soldier, John Thomson in 1808 when only sixteen and spent most of her adult life in Glasgow. She had eight children and lived to be eigthy-two years old.