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Print entitled 'Aloa Church Airshire'

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'Aloa Church Airshire', a copper plate engraving, 1790

Introduction:
Robert Burns was born at Alloway near Ayr on the 25th January 1759, the eldest of seven children of Agnes and William Burnes. His father was a market gardener, who having acquired a small holding of land, had built a cottage in the village.
Image Rights Holder:
Dumfries & Galloway Museums Service
Ref:
140
Project:
241:Robert Burns - People and Places
Material:
Paper
Dimensions:
Image - length: 124 mm, width: 174 mm
What:
Print entitled 'Aloa Church Airshire'
Subject:
This church is also famous for being the place wherein witches and warlocks used to hold their infernal meetings. Diverse stories of these horrid rites are still current; one of which my worthy friend Mr. Burns has here favoured me with in verse. This copper plate engraving of the old village church was printed by S Hooper of London and published in Captain Francis Grose's two volume, 'Antiquities of Scotland'.
Who:
S Hooper (212 High Holborn, London) (publisher)
Agnes Broun (1732-1820) (mother of the poet, Robert Burns)
William Burnes (1721-1784) (father of the poet, Robert Burns)
Captain Francis Grose (1731?-1791) (author)
Robert Burns (1759-1796) (he wrote poem for)
When:
1791 (book published)
1 May 1790 (print published)
Where:
Dumfries Museum, Dumfries & Galloway
Background:
This church is also famous for being the place wherein witches and warlocks used to hold their infernal meetings. Diverse stories of these horrid rites are still current; one of which my worthy friend Mr. Burns has here favoured me with in verse. This copper plate engraving of the old village church was printed by S Hooper of London and published in Captain Francis Grose's two volume, 'Antiquities of Scotland'.
Description:
Burns wrote the poem, 'Tam O'Shanter' as a 'witch story' to accompany this illustration of Alloway Kirk which was published by his friend, Captain Francis Grose in his 'Antiquities of Scotland'. Robert Burns and Francis Grose met and became friends whilst Grose was researching his book. They were both impressed by the atmosphere of the old church.